Tag » Porifera

Future research directions and gaps in our knowledge

In this final chapter, we explore the current gaps in our understanding of ocean acidification and increased sea surface temperature on sponges and highlight some future research directions to address these gaps. 99 kata lagi

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Bioeroding sponges and the future of coral reefs

Bioeroding sponges play a central role in carbonate cycling on corals reefs. They may respond differently to habitat deterioration than many other benthic invertebrates, because at some locations, their abundances increased after disturbance. 293 kata lagi

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Sponge reefs of the British Columbia, Canada Coast: impacts of climate change and ocean acidification

Sponge reefs living in deeper shelf waters on the western margin of North America are somewhat insulated from surface water effects of localized ocean warming but are susceptible to increasing hypoxia associated with ocean stratification and increasing upwelling. 235 kata lagi

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Molecular responses of sponges to climate change

We live in a time of concern regarding predicted environmental damage due to climate change, i.e. sea temperature increase and a reduction in ocean pH. Such changes will have severe consequences for at least some marine organisms. 226 kata lagi

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Climate change and sponges: an introduction

This chapter provides an introduction to our current understanding of the two most important features of climate change affecting marine sponges—ocean warming and ocean acidification. Of these two stressors, thermal stress associated with ocean warming is likely to have the greatest influence on the sponge assemblages through the induction of diseases and mortality by a decrease in the efficacy of defense mechanisms and development of pathogens. 283 kata lagi

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KINGDOM ANIMALIA

CLASSIFICATION OF LIVING THINGS

KINGDOM ANIMALIA

phylum porifera

Example (sponges)

The approximately 5,000 living sponge species are classified in the phylum Porifera, which is composed of three distinct groups, the Hexactinellida (glass sponges), the Demospongia, and the Calcarea (calcareous sponges).

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Combined effects of experimental acidification and eutrophication on reef sponge bioerosion rates

Health of tropical coral reefs depends largely on the balance between constructive (calcification and cementation) and destructive forces (mechanical-chemical degradation). Gradual increase in dissolved CO2 and the resulting decrease in carbonate ion concentration (“ocean acidification”) in ocean surface water may tip the balance toward net mass loss for many reefs. 343 kata lagi

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